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The Relationship between Endodontic Case Complexity and Treatment Outcomes.OBJECTIVE The aim of this work is to correlate between endodontic case complexities and treatment quality outcomes. METHODS Three hundred and forty nine radiographs of patients who had received endodontic treatment at a postgraduate dental institute in Dubai were retrieved from the Institute's data base. The majority of the cases were referred by in house general dental practitioners (GDPs). Unreadable radiographs were all excluded. From the original sample of 349,in total 51 radiographs were discarded. The final sample thus consisted of 298 root canal fillings of 211 patients treated by the endodontic postgraduate students. All radiographs were individually evaluated following the American Association of Endodontic Case Difficulty Assessment Form. Based on this, the technical quality of the root filling was evaluated for each individual case. RESULTS The sample consisted of 53% high,35% moderate and 12% minimal difficulty cases. Adequate homogeneity of root canal fillings were found in 93% of the cases. This compared with 90% of cases with adequate length of root fillings. There were statistically significant differences between the length of root canal filling and level of difficulty (p?=?0.016) but, no statistically significant difference between homogeneity of root canal filling and case difficulty (p?=?0.794). CONCLUSION Eighty four percent (0.93?×?0.90?=?0.84) of the cases treated proved to be adequate in terms of length and homogeneity which is in line with published work of Endodontic treatment carried out by specialists. CLINICAL SIGNIFICANCE GDPs require robust guidelines to help with appropriate referral of patients to Endodontic specialists.Fezai H, Al-Salehi S.OBJECTIVE The aim of this work is to correlate between endodontic case complexities and treatment quality outcomes. METHODS Three hundred and forty nine radiographs of patients who had received endodontic treatment at a postgraduate dental institute in Dubai were retrieved from the Institute's data base. The majority of the cases were referred by in house general dental practitioners (GDPs). Unreadable radiographs were all excluded. From the original sample of 349,in total 51 radiographs were discarded. The final sample thus consisted of 298 root canal fillings of 211 patients treated by the endodontic postgraduate students. All radiographs were individually evaluated following the American Association of Endodontic Case Difficulty Assessment Form. Based on this, the technical quality of the root filling was evaluated for each individual case. RESULTS The sample consisted of 53% high,35% moderate and 12% minimal difficulty cases. Adequate homogeneity of root canal fillings were found in 93% of the cases. This compared with 90% of cases with adequate length of root fillings. There were statistically significant differences between the length of root canal filling and level of difficulty (p?=?0.016) but, no statistically significant difference between homogeneity of root canal filling and case difficulty (p?=?0.794). CONCLUSION Eighty four percent (0.93?×?0.90?=?0.84) of the cases treated proved to be adequate in terms of length and homogeneity which is in line with published work of Endodontic treatment carried out by specialists. CLINICAL SIGNIFICANCE GDPs require robust guidelines to help with appropriate referral of patients to Endodontic specialists. Fezai H, Al-Salehi S. Dubai Health Authority, Dubai Hamdan Bin Mohammed College of Dental Medicine, Mohammed Bin Rashid University of Medicine and Health Sciences, Dubai Endodontic guidelines; case complexity; technical outcomes J Dent.Dubai Health Authority, DubaiHamdan Bin Mohammed College of Dental Medicine, Mohammed Bin Rashid University of Medicine and Health Sciences, DubaiJ Dent.Endodontic guidelines; case complexity; technical outcomesEndodontics12(19)30102-2.https//www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/311003312019The Relationship between Endodontic Case Complexity and Treatment Outcomes.0x01000BE60DE9C7F7DF4B8EA8A830051652C8
A per-protocol initiation of sacubitril/valsartan in an advanced heart failure disease management programme in the Middle East Gulf Region.AIMS The aim of this study is to evaluate the utilization and success in therapy intensification after initiation of sacubitril/valsartan using a specified protocol within an advanced heart failure and transplant programme in the Middle East Gulf Region. METHODS AND RESULTS We studied a single-centre, retrospective cohort in a 364-bedded multi-speciality hospital located in the United Arab Emirates (February 2016 to July 2017). The advanced heart failure and transplant programme formulated an institutional protocol for initiation of sacubitril/valsartan with defined criteria for switching from angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor (ACEI) and angiotensin II receptor blocker (ARB). Prescribing this drug is intended for patients with heart failure with reduced ejection fraction with left ventricular ejection fraction =40%. We excluded patients (i) with age below 18 years or (ii) initiated on sacubitril/valsartan from an outside hospital with or without follow-up in our outpatient clinic. We included 102 patients with an average initial dose of 78.9 ± 44.2 mg twice daily. Only 17 patients were on target doses of ACEI or ARB prior to switching to sacubitril/valsartan. Up-titration was successful in 55 patients during the follow-up period. In addition, 6.9% patients were hospitalized with heart failure exacerbation. In patients with elevated baseline serum potassium prior to initiating this medication, the serum potassium levels decreased post-initiation by 0.5 ± 0.3 mmol/L (P = 0.0008). CONCLUSIONS Initiating sacubitril/valsartan through a defined protocol selects for appropriate candidates and guides starting dose and titration. Overall, significant success can be achieved in replacing ACEI or ARB by sacubitril/valsartan in symptomatic heart failure with reduced ejection fraction patients.Atallah B, Sadik ZG, Hisham M, Kalagieh O, Hamour I, Gabra G, El Banna M, Soliman M, Cherfan A, Bader F.AIMS The aim of this study is to evaluate the utilization and success in therapy intensification after initiation of sacubitril/valsartan using a specified protocol within an advanced heart failure and transplant programme in the Middle East Gulf Region. METHODS AND RESULTS We studied a single-centre, retrospective cohort in a 364-bedded multi-speciality hospital located in the United Arab Emirates (February 2016 to July 2017). The advanced heart failure and transplant programme formulated an institutional protocol for initiation of sacubitril/valsartan with defined criteria for switching from angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor (ACEI) and angiotensin II receptor blocker (ARB). Prescribing this drug is intended for patients with heart failure with reduced ejection fraction with left ventricular ejection fraction =40%. We excluded patients (i) with age below 18 years or (ii) initiated on sacubitril/valsartan from an outside hospital with or without follow-up in our outpatient clinic. We included 102 patients with an average initial dose of 78.9 ± 44.2 mg twice daily. Only 17 patients were on target doses of ACEI or ARB prior to switching to sacubitril/valsartan. Up-titration was successful in 55 patients during the follow-up period. In addition, 6.9% patients were hospitalized with heart failure exacerbation. In patients with elevated baseline serum potassium prior to initiating this medication, the serum potassium levels decreased post-initiation by 0.5 ± 0.3 mmol/L (P = 0.0008). CONCLUSIONS Initiating sacubitril/valsartan through a defined protocol selects for appropriate candidates and guides starting dose and titration. Overall, significant success can be achieved in replacing ACEI or ARB by sacubitril/valsartan in symptomatic heart failure with reduced ejection fraction patients. Atallah B, Sadik ZG, Hisham M, Kalagieh O, Hamour I, Gabra G, El Banna M, Soliman M, Cherfan A, Bader F. Cleveland Clinic, Abu Dhabi Angiotensin II and neprilysin inhibitor; Heart failure ESC Heart Fail. Cleveland Clinic, Abu DhabiESC Heart Fail. Angiotensin II and neprilysin inhibitor; Heart failureHeart failure disease managementN/Ahttps//www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/310876292019A per-protocol initiation of sacubitril/valsartan in an advanced heart failure disease management programme in the Middle East Gulf Region.0x01000BE60DE9C7F7DF4B8EA8A830051652C8
Metabolic dysfunction in Emirati subjects in Abu Dhabi: Relationship to levels of soluble RAGEs.BACKGROUND The United Arab Emirates is experiencing increasing rates of type 2 diabetes (T2D) and its complications. As soluble levels of the receptor for advanced glycation end products, (sRAGE), and endogenous secretory RAGE (esRAGE), the latter an alternatively spliced form of AGER (the gene encoding RAGE), have been reported to be associated with T2D and its complications, we tested for potential relationships between these factors and T2D status in Emirati subjects. METHODS In a case-control study, we recruited Emirati subjects with T2D and controls from the Sheikh Khalifa Medical City in Abu Dhabi. Anthropomorphic characteristics, levels of plasma sRAGE and esRAGE, and routine chemistry variables were measured. RESULTS Two hundred and sixteen T2D subjects and 215 control subjects (mean age, 57.4?±?12.1 vs. 50.7?±?15.4?years; P?Abdulle A, Inman CK, Saleh A, Noshi M, Galani D, Abdelwareth L, Alsafar H, Elfatih A, Al Shamsi H, Ali R, Li H, Ramasamy R, Schmidt AM, Benbarka MM, Hassan MH.BACKGROUND The United Arab Emirates is experiencing increasing rates of type 2 diabetes (T2D) and its complications. As soluble levels of the receptor for advanced glycation end products, (sRAGE), and endogenous secretory RAGE (esRAGE), the latter an alternatively spliced form of AGER (the gene encoding RAGE), have been reported to be associated with T2D and its complications, we tested for potential relationships between these factors and T2D status in Emirati subjects. METHODS In a case-control study, we recruited Emirati subjects with T2D and controls from the Sheikh Khalifa Medical City in Abu Dhabi. Anthropomorphic characteristics, levels of plasma sRAGE and esRAGE, and routine chemistry variables were measured. RESULTS Two hundred and sixteen T2D subjects and 215 control subjects (mean age, 57.4?±?12.1 vs. 50.7?±?15.4?years; P? Abdulle A, Inman CK, Saleh A, Noshi M, Galani D, Abdelwareth L, Alsafar H, Elfatih A, Al Shamsi H, Ali R, Li H, Ramasamy R, Schmidt AM, Benbarka MM, Hassan MH. New York University Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates. Sheikh Khalifa Medical city Abu Dhabi Cleveland Clinic, Abu Dhabi Khalifa University of Science & Technology, Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates. DAM10, a disintegrin and metalloproteinase domain-containing protein 10; AGEs, advanced glycation endproducts; ARIC, Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities; BMI, body mass index; CARDS, Collaborative Atorvastatin Diabetes Study; CV, coefficient of variation; J Clin Transl Endocrinol. New York University Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates.Sheikh Khalifa Medical city Abu DhabiCleveland Clinic, Abu DhabiKhalifa University of Science & Technology, Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates.J Clin Transl Endocrinol.DAM10, a disintegrin and metalloproteinase domain-containing protein 10; AGEs, advanced glycation endproducts; ARIC, Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities; BMI, body mass index; CARDS, Collaborative Atorvastatin Diabetes Study; CV, coefficient of variation;Metabolic dysfunction16:100192. https//www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/310807422019Metabolic dysfunction in Emirati subjects in Abu Dhabi: Relationship to levels of soluble RAGEs.0x01000BE60DE9C7F7DF4B8EA8A830051652C8
Psychiatric Comorbidity in Neurological Disorders: Towards a Multidisciplinary Approach to Illness Management in the United Arab Emirates.Aim To determine the prevalence of mood and anxiety disorders in undiagnosed patients attending neurological services, and detect rates of referral to and attendance of psychiatric services. Methods Depressive symptoms and anxiety were assessed in 395 adult patients with primary diagnoses of neurological disorders. The Patient Health Questionnaire nine-item depression scale (PHQ-9), and Generalized Anxiety Disorder seven-item scale (GAD-7) were administered. Demographic details of the patients were recorded. Referral to and attendance of psychiatric services were recorded for patients scoring within the clinical range of depression and anxiety disorders (scores > 10). Results There was a 39% prevalence rate of depressive symptoms, 34% rate of anxiety, and 35.4% concurrent rate of both disorders in this cohort. The referral rate to psychiatric services was 33.6%, and attendance rate was 47.8%. There was significant association between severity of psychiatric symptoms and referral to psychiatric services, as well as significant association between comorbid psychiatric symptoms and attendance to psychiatric services. Conclusion Our results indicate similar prevalence rates of comorbid psychiatric symptoms to studies carried out in the Middle East and North Africa (MENA) region and relatively high attendance and referral rates to psychiatric services. Implications The results shed light on the clinical profile of patients in this region and support the need for integrated collaborative medical services. Moreover, findings have important implications for health care policies pertaining to resource distribution and funding.Alsaadi T, Kassie S, Mohamed Ali O, Mozahem K, Al Fardan S, Ahmed AM.Aim To determine the prevalence of mood and anxiety disorders in undiagnosed patients attending neurological services, and detect rates of referral to and attendance of psychiatric services. Methods Depressive symptoms and anxiety were assessed in 395 adult patients with primary diagnoses of neurological disorders. The Patient Health Questionnaire nine-item depression scale (PHQ-9), and Generalized Anxiety Disorder seven-item scale (GAD-7) were administered. Demographic details of the patients were recorded. Referral to and attendance of psychiatric services were recorded for patients scoring within the clinical range of depression and anxiety disorders (scores > 10). Results There was a 39% prevalence rate of depressive symptoms, 34% rate of anxiety, and 35.4% concurrent rate of both disorders in this cohort. The referral rate to psychiatric services was 33.6%, and attendance rate was 47.8%. There was significant association between severity of psychiatric symptoms and referral to psychiatric services, as well as significant association between comorbid psychiatric symptoms and attendance to psychiatric services. Conclusion Our results indicate similar prevalence rates of comorbid psychiatric symptoms to studies carried out in the Middle East and North Africa (MENA) region and relatively high attendance and referral rates to psychiatric services. Implications The results shed light on the clinical profile of patients in this region and support the need for integrated collaborative medical services. Moreover, findings have important implications for health care policies pertaining to resource distribution and funding. Alsaadi T, Kassie S, Mohamed Ali O, Mozahem K, Al Fardan S, Ahmed AM. American Center for Psychiatry and Neurology, Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates. Shaikh Khalifa Medical Center, Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates. United Arab Emirates; illness management; integrated collaborative medical services; multidisciplinary approach; neurological disorders; psychiatric comorbidity Front Psychiatry.American Center for Psychiatry and Neurology, Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates.Shaikh Khalifa Medical Center, Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates.Front Psychiatry.United Arab Emirates; illness management; integrated collaborative medical services; multidisciplinary approach; neurological disorders; psychiatric comorbidityNeurological Disorders10(263)https//www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/310732932019Psychiatric Comorbidity in Neurological Disorders: Towards a Multidisciplinary Approach to Illness Management in the United Arab Emirates.0x01000BE60DE9C7F7DF4B8EA8A830051652C8
Nutrition Knowledge and Satisfaction Levels of Postbariatric Surgery Adults in the United Arab Emirates: A Pilot Study.Research assessing the nutrition knowledge of postbariatric surgery patients is limited, although this category of patients is predisposed to malnutrition. In this pilot study, we explored postbariatric nutrition knowledge, satisfaction levels with dietitian nutrition counseling, and decision to undergo bariatric surgery of 83 patients who attended a postbariatric outpatient nutrition clinic in Dubai, United Arab Emirates (UAE). A cross-sectional design involving gender-stratified random sampling method was used to recruit 83 postbariatric surgery participants. A self-administered questionnaire was employed to collect information about nutrition knowledge related to dietary recommendations after bariatric surgery as well as participant views on dietitian nutrition counseling, their decision to undergo bariatric surgery, and nutrition-related complications experienced after the surgery. The mean (SD) knowledge score of postbariatric diet was 9.7 (2.05) out of a maximum possible score of 14. The majority of the participants (78.3%) correctly identified which foods are recommended during the first stage of the postbariatric surgery diet, and more than 90% knew about the importance of high-protein supplements after bariatric surgery. Female participants had significantly higher mean knowledge score compared to males (p=0.02). Although nearly 80% of the participants reported regular follow-up with their dietitian, only 10.8% reported high adherence to the dietitian's instructions. Moreover, more than two-thirds of the participants (71.1%) rated dietary advice provided by dietitians as vague. The most common complication experienced by the participants after bariatric surgery was nausea (61.4%). Furthermore, the majority of the participants (83.4%) found their daily and leisure activities to be more enjoyable after bariatric surgery. Ways of improving the quality of information delivery by dietitians should be explored to enhance patient comprehension and adherence to postbariatric surgery diet recommendations. Future research involving a larger and more representative sample to extend our findings are needed.Alia S, Ali H, Zoubeidi T, Ahmed M.Research assessing the nutrition knowledge of postbariatric surgery patients is limited, although this category of patients is predisposed to malnutrition. In this pilot study, we explored postbariatric nutrition knowledge, satisfaction levels with dietitian nutrition counseling, and decision to undergo bariatric surgery of 83 patients who attended a postbariatric outpatient nutrition clinic in Dubai, United Arab Emirates (UAE). A cross-sectional design involving gender-stratified random sampling method was used to recruit 83 postbariatric surgery participants. A self-administered questionnaire was employed to collect information about nutrition knowledge related to dietary recommendations after bariatric surgery as well as participant views on dietitian nutrition counseling, their decision to undergo bariatric surgery, and nutrition-related complications experienced after the surgery. The mean (SD) knowledge score of postbariatric diet was 9.7 (2.05) out of a maximum possible score of 14. The majority of the participants (78.3%) correctly identified which foods are recommended during the first stage of the postbariatric surgery diet, and more than 90% knew about the importance of high-protein supplements after bariatric surgery. Female participants had significantly higher mean knowledge score compared to males (p=0.02). Although nearly 80% of the participants reported regular follow-up with their dietitian, only 10.8% reported high adherence to the dietitian's instructions. Moreover, more than two-thirds of the participants (71.1%) rated dietary advice provided by dietitians as vague. The most common complication experienced by the participants after bariatric surgery was nausea (61.4%). Furthermore, the majority of the participants (83.4%) found their daily and leisure activities to be more enjoyable after bariatric surgery. Ways of improving the quality of information delivery by dietitians should be explored to enhance patient comprehension and adherence to postbariatric surgery diet recommendations. Future research involving a larger and more representative sample to extend our findings are needed. Alia S, Ali H, Zoubeidi T, Ahmed M. United Arab Emirates University, Al Ain Dubai Health Authority, Dubai N/A J Nutr MetabUnited Arab Emirates University, Al Ain Dubai Health Authority, DubaiJ Nutr MetabN/ANutrition Knowledge9148459https//www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/310617372019Nutrition Knowledge and Satisfaction Levels of Postbariatric Surgery Adults in the United Arab Emirates: A Pilot Study.0x01000BE60DE9C7F7DF4B8EA8A830051652C8
Knowledge, attitude and practice of antibiotic use among university students: a cross sectional study in UAE.BACKGROUND Antibiotic resistance became a marker of irrational and overuse of these medicines in many countries. This study aims to evaluate the knowledge, attitude and practice (KAP) of medical students (MS) and non-medical students (NS) towards antibiotic use in the United Arabs Emirates (UAE). METHOD A descriptive cross-sectional study was conducted amongst 1200 MS and NS from Ajman University in UAE. A self-administered questionnaire was used to assess the knowledge, attitude and practice of antibiotic use. The later was composed into knowledge, attitude and practice of antibiotic use. Descriptive analysis was used to analyse the qualitative variables while quantitative variables were summarised using mean?±?Standard Deviation (±SD). A Chi-square test was used to compare differences in the proportions of qualitative variables. Unpaired student's t-test was used to test the average differences in quantitative variables across medical and non-medical students. A pJairoun A, Hassan N, Ali A, Jairoun O Shahwan M.BACKGROUND Antibiotic resistance became a marker of irrational and overuse of these medicines in many countries. This study aims to evaluate the knowledge, attitude and practice (KAP) of medical students (MS) and non-medical students (NS) towards antibiotic use in the United Arabs Emirates (UAE). METHOD A descriptive cross-sectional study was conducted amongst 1200 MS and NS from Ajman University in UAE. A self-administered questionnaire was used to assess the knowledge, attitude and practice of antibiotic use. The later was composed into knowledge, attitude and practice of antibiotic use. Descriptive analysis was used to analyse the qualitative variables while quantitative variables were summarised using mean?±?Standard Deviation (±SD). A Chi-square test was used to compare differences in the proportions of qualitative variables. Unpaired student's t-test was used to test the average differences in quantitative variables across medical and non-medical students. A p Jairoun A, Hassan N, Ali A, Jairoun O Shahwan M. Ajman University Antibiotic usage; Attitude; KAP; Knowledge; Medical students; Practice BMC Public HealthAjman UniversityBMC Public HealthAntibiotic usage; Attitude; KAP; Knowledge; Medical students; PracticeAntibiotic use19(1):518.https//www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/310605432019Knowledge, attitude and practice of antibiotic use among university students: a cross sectional study in UAE.0x01000BE60DE9C7F7DF4B8EA8A830051652C8
An integrative assessment of the diversity, phylogeny, distribution, and conservation of the terrestrial reptiles (Sauropsida, Squamata) of the United Arab Emirates.In the present study we use an unprecedented database of 5,535 distributional records to infer the diversity, ecological preferences and spatial distribution of the 60 species of terrestrial reptiles of the United Arab Emirates (UAE), and use the 57 native species to test the effectiveness of the protected areas' network in conserving this unique vertebrate fauna. We infer a time-calibrated phylogeny with 146 species of squamates and 15 genes including all UAE terrestrial reptile species to determine the phylogenetic diversity (PD) and evolutionary distinctiveness (ED) of the native species and to compare it with the distribution of the hotspots of native species richness. The results of this study indicate that the sampling effort is remarkable, covering 75% of the country's territory representing nearly the entire climatic space of the UAE defined by the mean annual temperature and the total annual precipitation, as well as the multivariate climatic space defined by a principal component analysis (PCA). Species richness is highest in the northeast of the country, in a transitional area from sandy desert to the mountainous terrain of the Hajar Mountains. The highest PD of a single square cell of 10 arc-minutes grid is of 2,430 million years (my) of accumulated evolutionary history and the strong correlation between PD and species richness suggests that the raw number of species is a good surrogate to quantify the evolutionary history (i.e., PD). The species with the highest values of ED are those in families represented by only one species in the UAE. Finally, the assessment of the UAE protected areas shows that, despite their relevance in protecting the terrestrial reptiles, they do not offer adequate protection for some threatened species. Therefore, a reassessment of some of the protected areas or the creation of species specific conservation action plans are recommended in order to ensure the preservation of the unique diversity of UAE terrestrial reptiles.Burriel-Carranza B, Tarroso P, Els J, Gardner A, Soorae P, Mohammed AA, Tubati SRK, Eltayeb MM, Shah JN, Tejero-Cicuéndez H, Simó-Riudalbas M, Pleguezuelos JM, Fernández-Guiberteau D, Šmíd J, Carranza S.In the present study we use an unprecedented database of 5,535 distributional records to infer the diversity, ecological preferences and spatial distribution of the 60 species of terrestrial reptiles of the United Arab Emirates (UAE), and use the 57 native species to test the effectiveness of the protected areas' network in conserving this unique vertebrate fauna. We infer a time-calibrated phylogeny with 146 species of squamates and 15 genes including all UAE terrestrial reptile species to determine the phylogenetic diversity (PD) and evolutionary distinctiveness (ED) of the native species and to compare it with the distribution of the hotspots of native species richness. The results of this study indicate that the sampling effort is remarkable, covering 75% of the country's territory representing nearly the entire climatic space of the UAE defined by the mean annual temperature and the total annual precipitation, as well as the multivariate climatic space defined by a principal component analysis (PCA). Species richness is highest in the northeast of the country, in a transitional area from sandy desert to the mountainous terrain of the Hajar Mountains. The highest PD of a single square cell of 10 arc-minutes grid is of 2,430 million years (my) of accumulated evolutionary history and the strong correlation between PD and species richness suggests that the raw number of species is a good surrogate to quantify the evolutionary history (i.e., PD). The species with the highest values of ED are those in families represented by only one species in the UAE. Finally, the assessment of the UAE protected areas shows that, despite their relevance in protecting the terrestrial reptiles, they do not offer adequate protection for some threatened species. Therefore, a reassessment of some of the protected areas or the creation of species specific conservation action plans are recommended in order to ensure the preservation of the unique diversity of UAE terrestrial reptiles. Burriel-Carranza B, Tarroso P, Els J, Gardner A, Soorae P, Mohammed AA, Tubati SRK, Eltayeb MM, Shah JN, Tejero-Cicuéndez H, Simó-Riudalbas M, Pleguezuelos JM, Fernández-Guiberteau D, Šmíd J, Carranza S. Environment Agency, Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates. Dubai Municipality, Dubai, United Arab Emirates. N/A PLoS One.Environment Agency, Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates.Dubai Municipality, Dubai, United Arab Emirates.PLoS One.N/ATerrestrial reptiles14(5):e0216273https//www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/310488862019An integrative assessment of the diversity, phylogeny, distribution, and conservation of the terrestrial reptiles (Sauropsida, Squamata) of the United Arab Emirates.0x01000BE60DE9C7F7DF4B8EA8A830051652C8
May Measurement Month 2017: an analysis of blood pressure screening results from the United Arab Emirates-Northern Africa and Middle East.Elevated blood pressure (BP) is a growing burden worldwide, leading to over 10 million deaths each year. May Measurement Month (MMM) is a global initiative aimed at raising awareness of high BP and to act as a temporary solution to the lack of screening programmes worldwide. United Arab Emirates has a young population, but cardiovascular disease (CVD) is the commonest cause of death (40%). Myocardial infarction and stroke occurs at least a decade earlier than in western countries. Previous screening in our young population showed that 85% of the population had at least one CVD risk factor and about 62% of them were unaware of it. An opportunistic cross-sectional survey of volunteers aged =18 was carried out in May 2017. Blood pressure measurement, the definition of hypertension and statistical analysis followed the standard MMM protocol. Screening was held in 23 sites such as mosques, sports, and men's/ladies' clubs, airports, parks, shopping malls, work places as well as their residences, and in the public areas of hospitals or outpatient clinics. A total of 6193 individuals were screened during MMM17. The mean age was 39.2?±?13.1?years. After multiple imputation, 1867 (30.2%) had hypertension. Of individuals not receiving anti-hypertensive medication, 813 (15.8%) were hypertensive. Of 1054 individuals receiving anti-hypertensive medication, 427 (40.6%) had uncontrolled BP. MMM17 was a useful screening model as it makes BP measurement easily accessible. Eight hundred and thirteen (16%) possibly new hypertensives were uncovered and 427(40.6%) of those on treatment for hypertension were found to be uncontrolled. These results suggest that opportunistic screening can identify significant numbers with raised BP.Yusufali A, Bazargani N, Agrawal A, Muhammed K, Obaid H, Gabroun A, Albadwawi M, Albawab A, Musa A, Alraeesi F2, Vazir Z, Varghese R, Ravi Kumar R, Kobeissi E, Beaney T, Poulter NR.Elevated blood pressure (BP) is a growing burden worldwide, leading to over 10 million deaths each year. May Measurement Month (MMM) is a global initiative aimed at raising awareness of high BP and to act as a temporary solution to the lack of screening programmes worldwide. United Arab Emirates has a young population, but cardiovascular disease (CVD) is the commonest cause of death (40%). Myocardial infarction and stroke occurs at least a decade earlier than in western countries. Previous screening in our young population showed that 85% of the population had at least one CVD risk factor and about 62% of them were unaware of it. An opportunistic cross-sectional survey of volunteers aged =18 was carried out in May 2017. Blood pressure measurement, the definition of hypertension and statistical analysis followed the standard MMM protocol. Screening was held in 23 sites such as mosques, sports, and men's/ladies' clubs, airports, parks, shopping malls, work places as well as their residences, and in the public areas of hospitals or outpatient clinics. A total of 6193 individuals were screened during MMM17. The mean age was 39.2?±?13.1?years. After multiple imputation, 1867 (30.2%) had hypertension. Of individuals not receiving anti-hypertensive medication, 813 (15.8%) were hypertensive. Of 1054 individuals receiving anti-hypertensive medication, 427 (40.6%) had uncontrolled BP. MMM17 was a useful screening model as it makes BP measurement easily accessible. Eight hundred and thirteen (16%) possibly new hypertensives were uncovered and 427(40.6%) of those on treatment for hypertension were found to be uncontrolled. These results suggest that opportunistic screening can identify significant numbers with raised BP. Yusufali A, Bazargani N, Agrawal A, Muhammed K, Obaid H, Gabroun A, Albadwawi M, Albawab A, Musa A, Alraeesi F2, Vazir Z, Varghese R, Ravi Kumar R, Kobeissi E, Beaney T, Poulter NR. Dubai Health Authority, Dubai Dubai Medical University, Dubai, UAE. Ministry of Health and Prevention, United Arab Emirates United Medical Center, Dubai, UAE N/A Eur Heart J SupplDubai Health Authority, DubaiDubai Medical University, Dubai, UAE.Ministry of Health and Prevention, United Arab EmiratesUnited Medical Center, Dubai, UAEEur Heart J SupplN/ABlood pressure screening118-D120https//www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/310438972019May Measurement Month 2017: an analysis of blood pressure screening results from the United Arab Emirates-Northern Africa and Middle East.0x01000BE60DE9C7F7DF4B8EA8A830051652C8
Implementing Resident Research Program to Enhance Physicians Research in the United Arab Emirates.OBJECTIVESThe Dubai Residency Training Program (DRTP) commenced in the year 1993; then, a ""Residency Research Program (RRP)"" has implemented from 2011 to promote research among young physicians. This study was conducted by the Dubai Health Authority to review the RRP to assess its effectiveness in meeting original objectives and generating desired outcomes.METHODSSource documents such as the chronicles of the DRTP, communication between the stakeholders, resident feedback, research director, and program director reports were accessed and retrospectively reviewed.RESULTSSeven research workshops and ten advanced statistics courses were held. Ten scholarships were provided to the residents for ""Introduction to Clinical Research Training"" held by Harvard Medical School. Of 370 residents, a total of 156 residents submitted their research proposal, of which 128 residents presented their thesis. Nineteen residents presented their research on international conferences, 12 published their study, and 9 got award locally.CONCLUSIONSEfforts are focused on improving the quality of the research projects, as well as getting residents involved in research that leads eventually to publication. Research is a major component of DRTP; nevertheless, it is challenging for residents to conduct research successfully because of some barriers inherent in residency training. This experience was the first in the United Arab Emirates, and we believe that this paper will contribute to the integrating research in residency programs by the educators and academics in across countries within the region.Abdulrahman M, Ahmed A, Carrick FR.OBJECTIVESThe Dubai Residency Training Program (DRTP) commenced in the year 1993; then, a ""Residency Research Program (RRP)"" has implemented from 2011 to promote research among young physicians. This study was conducted by the Dubai Health Authority to review the RRP to assess its effectiveness in meeting original objectives and generating desired outcomes.METHODSSource documents such as the chronicles of the DRTP, communication between the stakeholders, resident feedback, research director, and program director reports were accessed and retrospectively reviewed.RESULTSSeven research workshops and ten advanced statistics courses were held. Ten scholarships were provided to the residents for ""Introduction to Clinical Research Training"" held by Harvard Medical School. Of 370 residents, a total of 156 residents submitted their research proposal, of which 128 residents presented their thesis. Nineteen residents presented their research on international conferences, 12 published their study, and 9 got award locally.CONCLUSIONSEfforts are focused on improving the quality of the research projects, as well as getting residents involved in research that leads eventually to publication. Research is a major component of DRTP; nevertheless, it is challenging for residents to conduct research successfully because of some barriers inherent in residency training. This experience was the first in the United Arab Emirates, and we believe that this paper will contribute to the integrating research in residency programs by the educators and academics in across countries within the region. Abdulrahman M, Ahmed A, Carrick FR. Dubai Health Authority, Dubai Education; medical; medical residents; middle east; physicians; research; residency training Int J Appl Basic Med Res.Dubai Health Authority, DubaiInt J Appl Basic Med Res.Education; medical; medical residents; middle east; physicians; research; residency trainingResident Research Program9(2):75-79https//www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/310411682019Implementing Resident Research Program to Enhance Physicians Research in the United Arab Emirates.0x01000BE60DE9C7F7DF4B8EA8A830051652C8
HLA genetic study from United Arab Emirates (UAE), Abu Dhabi.Emiratis belong to the United Arab Emirates (UAE) country. UAE is placed at the East part of the Arabian Peninsula, protruding into the Arabia Gulf and was populated since 130,000?years ago. First humans migrating out of Africa went probably across this territory. HLA-A, -B, -C, -DRB1, -DQB1, -DQA1 were typed in order to obtain HLA profile for clinical, epidemiological and population genetics studies. Twenty different HLA-A, thirty-five HLA-B and twenty-two HLA-C class I alleles were detected; twenty-seven different HLA-DRB1, fourteen HLA-DQB1 and twelve HLA-DQA1 class II alleles were found. Most frequent extended HLA haplotypes are also depicted. People are present in this area since prehistoric ages according to archaeological studies; the "Out of Africa" eastern migration may have affected the present day population composition.Arnaiz-Villena A, Yafei ZA, Juarez I, Palacio-Gruber J, Mahri AA, Alvares M, Lopez-Nares A3, Nieto J, Al Seiari M, Martin-Villa JM, ElGhazali G.Emiratis belong to the United Arab Emirates (UAE) country. UAE is placed at the East part of the Arabian Peninsula, protruding into the Arabia Gulf and was populated since 130,000?years ago. First humans migrating out of Africa went probably across this territory. HLA-A, -B, -C, -DRB1, -DQB1, -DQA1 were typed in order to obtain HLA profile for clinical, epidemiological and population genetics studies. Twenty different HLA-A, thirty-five HLA-B and twenty-two HLA-C class I alleles were detected; twenty-seven different HLA-DRB1, fourteen HLA-DQB1 and twelve HLA-DQA1 class II alleles were found. Most frequent extended HLA haplotypes are also depicted. People are present in this area since prehistoric ages according to archaeological studies; the "Out of Africa" eastern migration may have affected the present day population composition. Arnaiz-Villena A, Yafei ZA, Juarez I, Palacio-Gruber J, Mahri AA, Alvares M, Lopez-Nares A3, Nieto J, Al Seiari M, Martin-Villa JM, ElGhazali G. Sheikh Khalifa Medical city Abu Dhabi Abu Dhabi; Bedouins; Dubai; HLA; Mleiha; Population genetics; Prehistory; United Arab Emirates Hum Immunol. Sheikh Khalifa Medical city Abu DhabiHum Immunol. Abu Dhabi; Bedouins; Dubai; HLA; Mleiha; Population genetics; Prehistory; United Arab EmiratesHLA genetic study(19)30196-X.https//www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/310295122019HLA genetic study from United Arab Emirates (UAE), Abu Dhabi.0x01000BE60DE9C7F7DF4B8EA8A830051652C8

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